FMC Sustainability

Our Commitment to Sustainability

Legacy Web Access and GRI Indexes

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Explore the 2014 Legacy Web Access and GRI Index Materials

To explore the web access materials from the 2014 FMC Sustainability Report, please open the corresponding boxes below. For 2013 materials, click here.

Click here to read the full 2014 FMC Sustainability Report.

#1

Visit our Data Center.

#2

View the 2014 FMC Sustainability Report GRI Index.

#3

To learn more about FMC’s approach to sustainability visit the Formula + Goals page.

#4

To learn more about the Major Global Challenges visit the Formula + Goals page.

#5

In our 2014 report, we discuss the sustainability issues we believe are of most interest to our stakeholders and that are also relevant to FMC’s long-term business objectives. Learn more about our 2014 Materiality Assessment

#6

Engaging Our Stakeholders

FMC’s primary stakeholders are employees and prospective employees, customers, suppliers, investors, communities, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and governments. To identify the primary stakeholders with whom we engage, we conducted interviews with over 30 FMC leaders representing different aspects of our business to determine which groups they considered primary stakeholders. We also surveyed our Sustainability Communications Team, which represents many levels of the organization, to understand their perspective. Participants identified the groups with which they had significant interaction during 2014, that had a meaningful impact on our business, and/or on which FMC has an impact. Our sustainability team developed a comprehensive list of primary stakeholders based on this input. We expect all these stakeholders to use our 2014 Sustainability Report and find material information for their interests.

#7

FMC Sustainability Governance

Our sustainability governance structure provides overall guidance, priority setting and access to resources, while allowing core teams in each business and functional area to engage in detailed discussions that create value for FMC and its stakeholders. To learn more about Sustainability Governance Structure visit the Formula + Goals page.

#8

Building safety skills and maintaining a focused, attentive mindset are the foundation of our approach to providing a sound workplace. The more tangible FMC can make safety, the safer our employees will be. That is why we maintain a sharp focus on safety through our highly visible TH!NK. SAFE. commitment. With frequent messages targeting the risks employees face at work, at home, and on the road, we raise not only their awareness of hazards but also offer practical tips and solutions to avoid many types of incidents. In addition, in 2012, FMC developed a safety manifesto that expresses the deep commitment across the company to acting, operating, working and living safely.

To learn more about our commitment to safe workplace visit Our People page.

#9

To learn more about our Codes of Conduct and Corporate Policies visit the Explore our Resources page.

#10

FMC employees continue their involvement in improving the welfare of the communities where they live and work. With an emphasis on four areas of opportunity – education and science, health and human services, arts and culture, and environment and conservation – FMC helps reinforce already strong bonds with schools, advance much needed healthcare solutions and support a range of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that provided community assistance. Our activities at sites around the world include volunteerism, leadership, and financial support.

In 2012, we defined a way to measure our engagement efforts in order to track and advance our progress. We established a common framework for reporting on various interactions in our communities. Called the Community Engagement Index, it consists of four categories that we consider important factors in building and maintaining effective relationships. They are:

  • Safety – We provide community training on relevant safety topics, participate in local emergency response organizations and support other activities that foster community safety.
  • Operational transparency – We exchange information about our operations through community advisory panels, plant tours and other activities.
  • Community leadership – FMC employees bring their leadership skills to roles that strengthen the community. This may include participation in local Chambers of Commerce, service on charitable and non-profit boards and other roles that demonstrate leadership in the community.

To learn more about our community engagement initiatives visit the Our Responsibility page.

#11

Mentorship and STEM Education

FMC is a company of idea generators. Our ability to provide sustainably advantaged specialty chemical solutions is contingent upon a global workforce that is technically competent and intellectually agile. As idea people, we support mentorship of young people and the expansion of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education initiatives in the communities where we live and work. We look forward to future generations who are able to help tackle global challenges requiring STEM expertise.

To learn more about our education initiatives visit the Our Responsibility page.

#12

FMC firmly believes that business growth and ecological responsibility are compatible goals. To learn more about our support of biodiversity visit the Our Responsibility page.

#13

Remediation

Even though our historic operations were designed, operated and maintained using standards and best practices at the time, some operations had environmental impacts that require remediation today. FMC’s approach to remediation focuses on returning our formerly used sites to productive new uses. In the past decade, we have restored eight brownfield sites to beneficial reuses, including sports complexes, hospitals, retail developments, car dealerships, community centers and light industrial parks. In many cases, there is more than one type of redevelopment use on a single former property.

Our preferred approach is to be proactive with regulators, officials and the local community in identifying alternative reuse scenarios for these sites. Each property is uniquely situated, and some may have remediation needs. FMC is committed to finding ways to return these properties to functioning, safe and beneficial uses.

In each remediation situation, we start with shared goals in mind, doing whatever we can to take all stakeholders’ concerns into consideration. Each project requires a unique plan and an understanding of the community it affects, so we engage with public advisory groups, community partners and citizen task forces to facilitate conversations about each community’s needs. By collaborating on remediation plans, FMC aims to replenish resources, spur economic growth, protect the vitality of our business and the environment, and strengthen our community relationships.

To learn more about our remediation work visit the Our Responsibility page.

#14

View the 2014 FMC Annual Report.

#15

See the 2014 Sustainability Report GRI Index 2.10 for information on awards received in the reporting period.

#16

See the 2014 Sustainability Report GRI Index 4.13 for information on association membership.

#17

To see our global challenges in action, view FMC’s Impact on Major Global Challenges video.

#18

To learn more about the Major Global Challenges visit the Formula + Goals page.

#19

To learn more about the Major Global Challenges visit the Formula + Goals page.

#20

To learn more about the Major Global Challenges visit the Formula + Goals page.

#21

To learn more about the Major Global Challenges visit the Formula + Goals page.

#22

To learn more about the Major Global Challenges visit the Formula + Goals page.

#23


Rodrigo Tavares Marques, a Formulation & Development Coordinator for Herbicides, always ensures the use of proper PPE for himself and colleagues at the FMC Agricultural Solutions Latin America Innovation Center in São, Paulo, Brazil.


Mahesha Herath (Staff Chemist III), Ruth Anna Heckert (Global Quality Manager), and Scott Meiere (Application Development Manager) meet to discuss safety materials at the FMC Lithium R&D lab in Bessemer City, North Carolina.


Ensuring safe conditions must be habitual. At the FMC Health & Nutrition processing facility in Girvan, United Kingdom, Geoff Sim, Production Operator, always secures his safety belt before starting his forklift.

#24

FMC firmly believes that business growth and ecological responsibility are compatible goals. To learn more about our support of biodiversity visit the Our Responsibility page.

#25


Our workforce is highly skilled. Across our global businesses, FMC employees engage technology, scientific research, and institutional experience to develop creative solutions for our customers.


Graham Kerr, Lead Butyllithium Operator at FMC Lithium in Bromborough, United Kingdom, reviews his site’s Process Control Operator Interface, ensuring all process are running within proper specifications.


Susie Xie is a Natural Color Technologist at FMC Health and Nutrition Innovation Lab in Shanghai, China. She conducts a lab trial of color shade matching with FMC natural color products.

#26

Twitter twitter.com/fmccorp

#27

YouTube youtube.com/fmccorpcomm

#28

Facebook facebook.com/FMCCorporation

#29

LinkedIn linkedin.com/company/fmc-corporation

#30


Our research enables our innovation. At FMC Lithium in Bromborough, United Kingdom, Dave Linden (Laboratory Analyst), Anil Sharma (Plant Engineer) and Kevin Larmer (Laboratory Supervisor) discuss a sample analysis.


Joyce Toh, Food Technologist at the FMC Singapore Application Center, is a researcher who takes pride in providing precision in methodology and processes as she develops custom solutions for our customers, while keeping safety top-of-mind.


State-of-the-art research facilities allow our workforce to grow innovation. At our new Latin America Innovation Center, Marcio Bezzera and Rodrigo Tavares Marques develop agricultural solutions for customers across the region.

#31


Our focus at FMC is to provide solutions that allow growers to minimize crop disease and pests so they can increase yields using fewer resources. In Brazil, tomatoes are inspected for signs of disease.


At our FMC Lithium facility in Bessemer City, North Carolina, Joel Jones (Maintenance Manager), Jenerrio Evans (HVAC Technician), and Roger Rojas (E&I Technician) stand next to their first 100% electric powered maintenance vehicle.


As a Quality Control Analyst at the FMC Health & Nutrition processing facility in Girvan, United Kingdom, Maureen Hogan consistently performs assessments to ensure our products meet customer resource specifications.

#32


#33


#34


In Indonesia, FMC Ungaran facility staff visited TK PGRI Wiru, a kindergarten school in Semarang Regency to conduct their “School Dental Care and Health” program, offering proper dental care consultations and demonstrations.


FMC gives generously to organizations that are bettering our communities and educating our young people. In North Carolina, FMC Lithium provided funding and support for the Gaston Regional Science and Engineering Fair.


FMC Agricultural Solutions staged the Tree of Life – an interactive theatrical production focused on building environmental consciousness and good citizenship amongst rural youth in Brazil.

#35

Download the 2014 FMC Sustainability Report.

#36

Interact with our data.

#37

View the 2014 FMC Sustainability Report GRI Index.

#38

At FMC Corporation, sustainability is an integral part of how we do business. Through implementation and tracking of our coordinated, strategic approaches to sustainability, we are learning and doing more to increase the well-being of our people and communities and to address global challenges.

For us, sustainability is about creating enduring value by managing our innovation, operations and business practices to meet the changing demands of our markets, our shareholders and society. Sustainability is not a “program” at FMC. Rather, it is increasingly central to the way we work.

To learn more about approach to sustainability visit the Formula + Goals page.

#39

Sustainability + You

To be a leading global business in sustainability, we need you. While FMC leadership has committed the company to sustainability gains across operations, innovation and business practices, the energy and ideas needed to make sustainability a daily habit must come from you. Just as our company has focused on safety in the workplace, at home, and everywhere between, we at FMC want sustainable ways of doing business and living life to become second nature. With the focus and dedication of our workforce, our families and friends and our communities, together we can shape a sustainable future for tomorrow. It just takes you…

#40

We know sustainability is a journey that requires continuous refinement and improvement, and our commitment to sustainability comes from the very top of our organization. This commitment means that we will take action on sustainability targets and goals. With this focus, we always strive to improve alignment between our business strategy and our stakeholders’ requirements and expectations.

To learn more about our sustainability goals visit the Formula + Goals page.

#41

Explore our archive of sustainability and other company resources.

#42

Learn more about FMC Corporation.


2014 FMC Sustainability Report Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Index

FMC uses the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) to inform our sustainability reporting. GRI has verified that the 2014 sustainability report was prepared according to the GRI Guidelines, at Application Level B.

GRI provides organizations with guidance in applying its comprehensive sustainability reporting framework covering economic, environmental and social sustainability disclosure criteria. The framework has been broadly adopted around the world to assess sustainability performance. The 2014 FMC GRI Index provides a consolidated list of our disclosures against the G3.1 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines.

We welcome your questions, comments and feedback. For more information about FMC or our Sustainability Report, please contact sustainability.info@fmc.com.

1. Strategy and Analysis

1.1

Statement from the most senior decision-maker of the organization.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 1

1.2

Description of key impacts, risks, and opportunities.

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 2-5; 2014 Annual Report- Form 10-K pp. 9-12

2.Organizational Profile

2.1

Name of the organization.

FMC Corporation

2.2

Primary brands, products, and/or services.

2014 Sustainability Report About this Report (inside front cover), p. 2; 2014 Annual Report: Form 10-K, p. 2

2.3

Operational structure of the organization, including main divisions, operating companies, subsidiaries, and joint ventures.

2014 Sustainability Report  About this Report (inside front cover), p. 2; 2014 Annual Report- Form 10-K pp. 3-7

2.4

Location of organization’s headquarters.

Philadelphia PA, USA

2.5

Number of countries where the organization operates, and names of countries with either major operations or that are specifically relevant to the sustainability issues covered in the report.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 2; 2014 Annual Report- Form 10-K pp. 3

2.6

Nature of ownership and legal form.

2014 Annual report Form 10-K p. 1

2.7

Markets served (including geographic breakdown, sectors served, and types of customers/beneficiaries).

2014 Sustainability Report p. 2; Annual Report- Form 10-K pp. 3-7

2.8

Scale of the reporting organization.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 13; Annual Report- Form 10-K pp. 3-7

2.9

Significant changes during the reporting period regarding size, structure, or ownership.

2014 Sustainability Report  About this Report (inside front cover); Annual Report- Form 10-K pp. 1-2

2.10

Awards received in the reporting period.

2014 Sustainability Report, pp. 23, 24; See additional information below

Awards received in the reporting period

• American Chemistry Council Energy Efficiency Award, to FMC Alkali, Granger, Wyoming facility

• American Chemistry Council Energy Efficiency Award, to FMC Health and Nutrition Rockland, Maine facility

• American Chemistry Council Facility Safety Award, to FMC Agricultural Solutions Middleport, New York facility

• American Chemistry Council Facility Safety Award, to FMC Global Innovation Center in Ewing, New Jersey

• PR Daily’s Corporate Social Responsibility Awards, 2013 Best Employee Health and Safety Program for TH!NK.SAFE.

• Investor Relations Society 2014 Most Effective Sustainability Communication – International

• Public Relations Society of America Special Purpose Publication Ladle award

• Best Corporate Governance, Runner Up Best Human Resources – Best of Dinheiro Magazine 2014, Brazil

• Antonio Zem, President, FMC Latin America, Vice President, FMC Agricultural Solutions, Latin America, recognized as one of the 100 most influential people in agribusiness by Dinheiro Magazine, Brazil

3. Report Parameters

3.1

Reporting period (e.g., fiscal/calendar year) for information provided.

2014 Sustainability Report, User’s Guide to Reading this Report (inside front cover)

3.2

Date of most recent previous report (if any).

2013 Sustainability Report

3.3

Reporting cycle (annual, biennial, etc.)

2014 Sustainability Report, User’s Guide to Reading this Report (inside front cover)

3.4

Contact point for questions regarding the report or its contents.

Linda Froelich, Global Sustainability Director, sustainability.info@fmc.com

2014 Sustainability Report, User’s Guide to Reading this Report

3.5

Process for defining report content.

2014 Sustainability Report, p. 4, and see www.fmcsustainability.com/our-formula-goals

3.6

Boundary of the report (e.g., countries, divisions, subsidiaries, leased facilities, joint ventures, suppliers). See GRI Boundary Protocol for further guidance.

2014 Sustainability Report, User’s Guide to Reading this Report (inside front cover)

3.7

State any specific limitations on the scope or boundary of the report (see completeness principle for explanation of scope).

2014 Sustainability Report, User’s Guide to Reading this Report (inside front cover)

3.8

Basis for reporting on joint ventures, subsidiaries, leased facilities, outsourced operations, and other entities that can significantly affect comparability from period to period and/or between organizations.

2014 Sustainability Report, User’s Guide to Reading this Report (inside front cover)

3.9

Data measurement techniques and the bases of calculations, including assumptions and techniques underlying estimations applied to the compilation of the Indicators and other information in the report. Explain any decisions not to apply, or to substantially diverge from, the GRI Indicator Protocols.

2014 Sustainability Report. User’s Guide to Reading this Report (inside front cover);  Also see fmcsustainability.com/visualize-our-data

3.10

Explanation of the effect of any re-statements of information provided in earlier reports, and the reasons for such re-statement (e.g.,mergers/acquisitions, change of base years/periods, nature of business, measurement methods).

FMC has no restatements of data for 2014 Sustainability Report from previous reports.

3.11

Significant changes from previous reporting periods in the scope, boundary, or measurement methods applied in the report.

FMC has no significant changes from previous reporting periods.

3.12

Table identifying the location of the Standard Disclosures in the report.

This information can be found in this index, see below.

3.13

Policy and current practice with regard to seeking external assurance for the report.

In preparation for external assurance, we are conducting an assurance readiness project.

4. Governance, Commitments, and Engagement

4.1

Governance structure of the organization, including committees under the highest governance body responsible for specific tasks, such as setting strategy or organizational oversight.

FMC.com > Company Information > Committee Composition FMC.com:  Committee Composition

4.2

Indicate whether the Chair of the highest governance body is also an executive officer.

FMC.com > Company Information >Board of Directors

4.3

For organizations that have a unitary board structure, state the number and gender of members of the highest governance body that are independent and/or non-executive members.

FMC.com > Company Information >Board of Directors

4.4

Mechanisms for shareholders and employees to provide recommendations or direction to the highest governance body.

FMC.com >Investor Services>  Shareholder services  

4.5

Linkage between compensation for members of the highest governance body, senior managers, and executives (including departure arrangements), and the organization’s performance (including social and environmental performance).

2015 Proxy Materials  https://materials.proxyvote.com/Approved/302491/20150303/NPS_236328.PDF

4.6

Processes in place for the highest governance body to ensure conflicts of interest are avoided.

2015 Proxy Materials  https://materials.proxyvote.com/Approved/302491/20150303/NPS_236328.PDF

4.7

Process for determining the composition, qualifications, and expertise of the members of the highest governance body and its committees, including any consideration of gender and other indicators of diversity.

2015 Proxy Materials  https://materials.proxyvote.com/Approved/302491/20150303/NPS_236328.PDF

4.8

Internally developed statements of mission or values, codes of conduct, and principles relevant to economic, environmental, and social performance and the status of their implementation.

FMC.com> Company Information> Corporate Governance Guidelines (http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=117919&p=irol-governance); FMC Code of Ethics and Business Conduct (http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=117919&p=irol-govConduct); 2013 Sustainability Report p. 21

4.9

Procedures of the highest governance body for overseeing the organization’s identification and management of economic, environmental, and social performance, including relevant risks and opportunities, and adherence or compliance with internationally agreed standards, codes of conduct, and principles.

Charter of the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors (http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=117919&p=irol-governance), 2015 Proxy Materials (https://materials.proxyvote.com/Approved/302491/20150303/NPS_236328.PDF)

4.10

Processes for evaluating the highest governance body’s own performance, particularly with respect to economic, environmental, and social performance.

2015 Proxy Materials  https://materials.proxyvote.com/Approved/302491/20150303/NPS_236328.PDF

4.11

Explanation of whether and how the precautionary approach or principle is addressed by the organization.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 4

4.12

Externally developed economic, environmental, and social charters, principles, or other initiatives to which the organization subscribes or endorses.

American Chemistry Council Responsible Care Management System, multiple ISO certifications at manufacturing locations globally

4.13

Memberships in associations (such as industry associations) and/or national/international advocacy organizations in which the organization: * Has positions in governance bodies; * Participates in projects or committees; * Provides substantive funding beyond routine membership dues; or * Views membership as strategic.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 9, Also see below for more information.

4.13: Memberships in Associations

FMC is actively engaged in leading industry groups. Some examples include:

American Chemistry Council

Agricultural Retailers Association

Brazil-US Business Council

Business Roundtable

CropLife America

Electric Drive Transportation Association

International Conservation Caucus Foundation

National Association of Manufacturers

Public Affairs Council

Regulatory Improvement Council

US-China Business Council

Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment

Pennsylvania Environmental Council

Superfund Settlements Coalition

International Food Additives Council

Natural Food Colours Association

American Business Council

Chemexcil

Japan Pest Control Association

Agricultural Retailer Association

Agricultural Container Recycling Council

Pyrethroid Working Group

National Cotton Council

National Agricultural Marketing Association

4.14

List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organization.

2014 Sustainability Report p.4

4.15

Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders with whom to engage.

2014 Sustainability Report p.4, and see below for more information

Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders with whom to engage.

FMC’s primary stakeholders are employees and prospective employees, customers, suppliers, investors, communities, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and governments. To identify the primary stakeholders with whom we engage, we conducted interviews with over 30 FMC leaders representing different aspects of our business to determine which groups they considered primary stakeholders. We also surveyed our Sustainability Communications Team, which represents many levels of the organization, to understand their perspective. Participants identified the groups with which they had significant interaction during 2014, that had a meaningful impact on our business, and/or on which FMC has an impact. Our sustainability team developed a comprehensive list of primary stakeholders based on this input.  We expect all these stakeholders to use our 2014 Sustainability Report and find material information for their interests.

4.16

Approaches to stakeholder engagement, including frequency of engagement by type and by stakeholder group.

2014 Sustainability Report p.4

4.17

Key topics and concerns that have been raised through stakeholder engagement, and how the organization has responded to those key topics and concerns, including through its reporting.

2014 Sustainability Report p.4

Disclosures on Management  Approach

Disclosure on Management Approach (Economic)

DMA EC

Economic performance

2014 Annual Report and Form 10-K

DMA EC

Market presence

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 28-33

DMA EC

Indirect economic impacts

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 28-33

Disclosure on Management Approach (Environment)

DMA EN

Energy  

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 22-27; 2014 Annual Report Form 10K p. 29-30

DMA EN

Water  

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 22-27, 2014 Annual Report Form 10K p. 29-30

DMA EN

Biodiversity

2014 Sustainability Report p. 20, 24, Also see www.fmcsustainability.com/our-responsibility

DMA EN

Emissions, effluents and waste

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 22-27, 2014 Annual Report Form 10K p. 29-30

DMA EN

Products and services

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 22-27, 2014 Annual Report Form 10K p. 29-30

DMA EN

Compliance

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 23, 26

Disclosure on Management Approach (Labor Practices and Decent Work)

DMA LA

Employment

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 12-15

DMA LA

Labor/management relations

2014 Sustainability Report p. 9

DMA LA

Occupational health and safety

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 6-11

DMA LA

Training and education

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 12-15

DMA LA

Diversity and equal opportunity

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 12-15

Disclosure on Management Approach (Human Rights)

DMA HR

Investment and procurement practices

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 25-27

DMA HR

Non-discrimination

FMC Code of Ethics (http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=117919&p=irol-governance)

DMA HR

Freedom of association and collective bargaining

FMC Code of Ethics (http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=117919&p=irol-governance)

DMA HR

Child labor

FMC Code of Ethics (http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=117919&p=irol-governance)

DMA HR

Prevention of forced and compulsory labor

FMC Code of Ethics (http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=117919&p=irol-governance)

DMA HR

Security practices

2014 Sustainability Report p. 14

DMA HR

Assessment

2014 Sustainability Report p. 5

Disclosure on Management Approach (Society)

DMA SO

Local communities

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 28-33

DMA SO

Corruption

2013 Sustainability Report p. 21

Disclosure on Management Approach (Product Responsibility)

DMA PR

Customer health and safety

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 6-11

DMA PR

Product and service labelling

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 20, 23, foodsciencematters.com

Disclosures on Performance Indicators

Disclosure on Performance Indicator (Economic)

Economic Performance

EC1

Direct economic value generated and distributed, including revenues, operating costs, employee compensation, donations and other community investments, retained earnings, and payments to capital providers and governments.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 2, 2014 Annual Report Form 10K

EC2

Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization’s activities due to climate change.

2014 Annual Report Form 10K p. 28-29, 2014 Sustainability Report p. 2

Disclosure on Performance Indicator (Environment)

Energy

EN3

Direct energy consumption by primary energy source.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 26

EN4

Indirect energy consumption by primary source.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 26

EN5

Energy saved due to conservation and efficiency improvements.

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 22-23

EN6

Initiatives to provide energy-efficient or renewable energy based products and services, and reductions in energy requirements as a result of these initiatives.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 16-21

Water

EN8

Total water withdrawal by source.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 24

EN9

Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water.

2013 Sustainability Report p. 33

Biodiversity

EN11

Location and size of land owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas.

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 20, 23, 24, Also see www.fmcsustainability.com/our-responsibility

EN12

Description of significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas.

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 20, 23, 24, Also see www.fmcsustainability.com/our-responsibility

EN13

Habitats protected or restored.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 24, Also see www.fmcsustainability.com/our-responsibility

EN14

Strategies, current actions, and future plans for managing impacts on biodiversity.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 23, Also see www.fmcsustainability.com/our-responsibility

Emissions, Effluents and Waste

EN16

Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 27

EN20

NOx, SOx, and other significant air emissions by type and weight.

See fmcsustainability.com/visualize-our-data

EN22

Total weight of waste by type and disposal method.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 25, also see fmcsustainability.com/visualize-our-data

EN23

Total number and volume of significant spills.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 7

Products and Services

EN26

Initiatives to mitigate environmental impacts of products and services, and extent of impact mitigation.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 16-21

Compliance

EN28

Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations.

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 23, 26

Disclosure on Performance Indicator (Social: Labor Practices and Decent Work)

Employment

LA1

Total workforce by employment type, employment contract, and region, broken down by gender.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 13, 15

LA2

Total number and rate of new employee hires and employee turnover by age group, gender, and region.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 13, 15

LA3

Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees, by major operations.

FMC.com > Careers > Benefits (http://www.fmc.com/careers/Benefits.aspx)

Labor/Management Relations

LA4

Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining agreements.

2014 Annual Report Form 10K p. 8

Occupational Health and Safety

LA7

Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities by region and by gender.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 7

LA8

Education, training, counseling, prevention, and risk-control programs in place to assist workforce members, their families, or community members regarding serious diseases.

2013 Sustainability Report p. 20, FMC.com > Careers > Benefits (http://www.fmc.com/careers/Benefits.aspx)

Training and Education

LA11

Programs for skills management and lifelong learning that support the continued employability of employees and assist them in managing career endings.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 12-15; FMC.com > Careers > Benefits (http://www.fmc.com/careers/Benefits.aspx)

LA12

Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews, by gender.

2014 Sustainability Report pp. 13-15

LA12: % of employees receiving regular performance reviews, by gender

Our philosophy is that learning and growing on the job are the primary means of development. Individuals and their managers share responsibility for career growth. The needs of FMC businesses create opportunities for employees to undertake challenging work assignments. Employees and managers actively look for those opportunities that match the employees’ interests. Coaching, education and ongoing feedback are tools that are available to both the employee and the manager to support development. Additionally, our Education Program empowers employees to prepare themselves for further development opportunities by supporting the cost of tuition and fees for approved continuing education programs. We continue to work on programs that help prepare and support our employees who are transitioning into retirement. These programs include career transition support, support from local employee assistance programs, financial counseling from our benefit vendors, and personalized care from local human resources managers and supervisors.

Additionally, annual summary discussions are expected to take place between employees and managers to formally evaluate performance and discuss plans for increasing for increasing the employee’s skills, knowledge and abilities. All salaried employees must have a performance discussion and development review document completed at least every 12 months.

Diversity

LA13

Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per employee category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity.

FMC.com > Investor Relations > Leadership Team (http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=117919&p=irol-govmanage)

Disclosure on Performance Indicator (Social: Human Rights)

Investment and Procurement Practices

HR2

Percentage of significant suppliers, contractors and other business partners that have undergone human rights screening, and actions taken.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 5, 26

HR3

Total hours of employee training on policies and procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained.

2014 Sustainanbility Report p. 14 and see below

HR3: Total hours of employee training on policies and procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained.

Our responsibility extends beyond FMC’s door, which is why we added a supply chain-focused Human Dignity training program to our curriculum. Our goal is to ensure that FMC only works with responsible suppliers. The training was completed in early 2015 by all FMC employees globally, for a total of approximately 2,700 hours of employee training on identifying and responding to potential human rights violations such as human trafficking, forced labor and inappropriate wages or working hours.

Disclosure on Performance Indicator (Social: Society)

Local Communities

SO1

Percentage of operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and development programs.

We work to engage the local communities at all of our sites around the world. 2014 Sustainability Report p. 28-33

Corruption

SO2

Percentage and total number of business units analyzed for risks related to corruption.

Under FMC’s rigorous anti-corruption risk assessment program, one hundred percent of FMC business units are analyzed for risk related to corruption.

SO3

Percentage of employees trained in organization’s anti-corruption policies and procedures.

All FMC employees located throughout the world receive basic training for legal compliance and ethical behavior, including anti-corruption training. Those management and non-management employees who are in commercial positions and those who have contact with government officials receive additional, more focused anti-corruption training.

Disclosure on Performance Indicator (Social: Product Responsibility)

Customer Health and Safety

PR1

Life cycle stages in which health and safety impacts of products and services are assessed for improvement, and percentage of significant products and services categories subject to such procedures.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 18, 2012 Sustainability Report p. 15-16, see www.fmcsustainability.com/our-products, and see below.

Each FMC business has a Product Stewardship and Sustainability Assessment (PSSA) through which 100% of new products or projects are assessed for safety and sustainability criteria. FMC reports annually on the percentage of its products that are determined to be “sustainably advantaged” through this assessment.

Product and Service Labeling

PR3

Type of product and service information required by procedures, and percentage of significant products and services subject to such information requirements.

2014 Sustainability Report p. 20, 23, and see foodsciencematters.com, our FMC Health and Nutrition food science transparency website.

PR5

Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction.

See below for more information

PR5: Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction.

We find that the knowledge we’ve gained by listening closely and observing our customers helps to shape our innovation and product development efforts. We strive to hear the voice of the customer. While we do this primarily through personal interactions, we also employ tools such as surveys and provide services for customers including training and technical assistance. Our feedback and interaction mechanisms range from customer forums and user groups to formal mechanisms for customers to express any aspect of service where they are not satisfied. We value all input, especially that which leads to further improvement.

 

Our Materiality Process

In our 2014 report, we discuss the sustainability issues we believe are of most interest to our stakeholders that are also relevant to FMC’s long-term business objectives. Learn more about our 2014 Materiality Assessment here.

 

Explore the 2013 Legacy Web Access and GRI Index Materials

To explore the web access materials from the 2013 FMC Sustainability Report, please open the corresponding boxes below.

Click here to read the full 2013 FMC Sustainability Report.

#1

See the 2013 Sustainability Report GRI Index 4.14–4.17 on stakeholder engagement.

#2

See the 2013 Sustainability Report GRI Index 4.14–4.17 on stakeholder engagement, specifically on Communities, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO) and Governments.

#3

In our 2013 report, we discuss the sustainability issues we believe are of most interest to our stakeholders and that are also relevant to FMC’s long-term business objectives. Learn more about our 2013 Materiality Assessment.

#4

In 2013, FMC created a series of videos focused on embedding safe practices throughout our company. See our Resources page to view videos.

#5

Pathways to Leadership

FMC Corporation is a member of the American Chemistry Council (ACC) and a proud participant in the Responsible Care® program – the industry’s premier voluntary environmental, health, safety and security initiative. Like all participating companies, FMC has made a CEO-level commitment to uphold the program’s elements and guiding principles. One of the most far-reaching elements of Responsible Care is product stewardship. Companies also are committed to open and transparent reporting, and submit annual data on their progress. This information is made publicly available on the ACC website.

#6

See our Resources page to view and download our Supplier Code of Conduct.

#7

In 2012, we defined a way to measure our engagement efforts in order to track and advance our progress. Our “Community Engagement Index” quantifies our involvement in four categories at our major sites. We selected these categories of engagement based on FMC’s unique role as a chemical company, our related areas of expertise and our desire to maintain a trusted relationship with our local communities.

The four categories are: safety, operational transparency, community leadership and community partnership.

To raise our Community Engagement Index, we challenge all FMC sites to get involved in these four partnership categories every year. Each quarter, our sites report on their progress in these areas.

For more details on the categories mentioned above, our progress or our calculation method, visit the Data Center (Visualize Our Data section) to see our community index metrics.

#8

Product Stewardship

Our three businesses (Agricultural Solutions, Health & Nutrition and Minerals) incorporate appropriate health, safety, security and environmental factors into their product lifecycles. Our holistic approach starts with design and development and extends through manufacturing, distribution, storage, end use, and final recycle or disposal. Along the way, those who handle the product are provided with information and training on hazards and safe handling practices.

Each business has an employee responsible for product stewardship who is charged with assessing and documenting the hazards and risks associated with each product. This formal governance process helps us prioritize products for risk management and provides the appropriate level of information and outreach.

FMC uses a variety of tools to help ensure that safety information and knowledge reach those who need it, starting with required documentation such as the Safety Data Sheet and product label.

Depending on the degree of hazard and potential for exposure, FMC also provides a range of information, including some of the items below:

• Customer education initiatives

• Technical brochures and risk information

• Safe handling guidelines and recommendations for the use of protective equipment

• Training in safe handling practices

• Technical support

• Order screening to ensure customer qualification

• Tracking of customer issues and incidents to identify areas for improvement

• On-site customer visits

Training our Customers on Safe Use

As with all FMC businesses, Agricultural Solutions incorporates health, safety, security and environmental considerations into every stage of a product’s life cycle. In our labeling, safety data sheets, product education and other technical assistance, FMC provides the information farmers need to use our products safely. FMC technical experts conduct training meetings with distributors, farmers and applicators on the safe and responsible use of our products. We communicate with our distributors and customers about the latest information on our products, their intended uses, legal requirements, and the consequences of misuse.

Although we take many precautions and many thousands of farmers around the world use our products without incident, occasionally we learn of the misuse of products, sometimes with serious results.

#9

Talent Development

Once employees join our team, they have access to on-the-job training opportunities. In addition to position-specific training, FMC offers a variety of development and leadership programs that nurture employees through different stages of their career, including those described here.

Pathways to Leadership: One of our most popular courses, this two-day workshop teaches frontline managers and those who lead project teams how to improve their leadership and team member development. The program includes post session follow-up on participant progress and focuses on coaching for performance, conducting effective meetings, distinguishing leadership from management, and using teams for problem solving.

Leadership Boot Camp: Nominated employees attend six full days of Boot Camp sessions to develop their personal leadership styles, practice interpersonal skills, and learn how to effectively lead teams at FMC. Additional training is held annually for program attendees.

FMC Academia: Our Latin America region started this program to align its formal and informal learning opportunities with the company’s growth strategy and changing needs. Development focuses on several knowledge areas to improve leadership, business competencies, quality of life, safety and the environment.

FMC’s Global Talent Management director is responsible for ensuring a pipeline of talent throughout the corporation, and for placing an emphasis on learning and development opportunities that grow employees at all levels of their careers.

#10

See our Resources page to view our video on talent development at FMC’s Singapore office.

#11

Respect and Ethical Behavior

Our focus on people extends beyond FMC employees to encompass the many people around the world who directly and indirectly touch our business. As we continue to grow globally, we recognize the potential risks of operating in multiple regions with differing laws and business practices.

#12

FMC Code of Ethics

FMC’s Code of Ethics and Business Conduct (Code) summarizes the legal and ethical principles that we follow in our daily work. FMC’s commitment to the Code starts at the corporation’s highest level. The FMC Corporate Responsibility Committee manages FMC’s overall compliance with applicable law and FMC policies (including the Code) and compliance training. This committee consists of our chief executive officer, chief financial officer, executive vice president of human resources, executive vice president and general counsel, and one of our business presidents. The group also considers the appropriate response to significant ethics and compliance matters. The Committee reports to the Audit Committee of the FMC Board of Directors.

In 2012, we clarified our commitment in this area by updating our Code of Ethics and Business Conduct to unambiguously state our expectations related to human dignity. While our businesses have consistently maintained high standards in this area, we saw this policy update as an important reaffirmation of our ethical principles and practices, especially as our business grows worldwide.

Every new FMC employee receives ethics compliance training, followed by recertification at least every three years to ensure strict adherence to our Code of Ethics. Required re-training and re-certification on the Code took place in 2013.

To view more information on 2013 training and activities, view 2013 report update.

FMC employees worldwide are encouraged to report suspected violations of the FMC Code and other legal or ethical violations through a confidential and anonymous system managed by Global Compliance, a leading provider of outsourced governance, risk management and compliance services. Employees can contact Global Compliance 24 hours a day, 7 days per week either by phone, web or mail. Global Compliance provides multi lingual service and has trained staff to handle ethics calls.

It is FMC’s policy to investigate any reported violation of the Code, other FMC policy, or applicable law, and to take appropriate action, as determined by FMC, based on the results of the investigation. It is also FMC’s policy that every employee may report violations with no fear of retaliation by co-workers, supervisors, or others.

#13

Responsible Procurement

FMC built a reputation as a responsible and reliable supplier of quality products because we carefully and systematically manage risks that might impact our integrity in the marketplace. We believe our customers’ valuable brands deserve our full measure of protection and we take steps to provide that protection not only in our manufacturing but also in procurement.

In early 2011, FMC formed a global procurement organization to oversee the sourcing of goods, materials and services across the company. This group reviewed best practices in procurement and vendor relationships to revise our own procurement procedures and assure that our program is best in class. As a result eProcure was launched in 2012. This program standardizes processes globally through a suite of online systems designed to efficiently and responsibly manage procurement worldwide.

These improved procurement systems help us analyze data in numerous ways and in real time. They also allow FMC to make informed and consistent procurement decisions that create cost- and risk-reduction opportunities.

FMC has long chosen to work with suppliers who share in our commitment to ethical and sustainable business practices. In 2012 we formalized that commitment by implementing a new supplier selection and management process that explicitly incorporates both minimum standards and preferred practices to support our sustainability principles. To explain our minimum standards clearly to existing and potential suppliers, we published FMC’s first Supplier Code of Conduct, which sets forth FMC’s expectations regarding legal compliance, environmental, health, safety, ethical, human dignity and fair labor practice issues. Suppliers also have a responsibility to take reasonable measures to ensure that their vendors and sub-contractors are acting in harmony with these same priorities.

In tandem with our Supplier Code of Conduct, our vendor management process evaluates supply chain partners using screening criteria that help us foster relationships with suppliers whose sustainability approach aligns closely with ours. In 2012, FMC began evaluating new suppliers using this vendor selection and management process. We continue to expand this program by soliciting comparable information from significant suppliers already approved by FMC when this new process was defined.

Supplier relationships

supplierInfographic

#14

Measurement and Transparency

FMC measures and monitors our environmental impacts to better assess opportunities for improvement. Our primary focus includes energy utilization, greenhouse gas emissions, water use and waste management. We have established key performance indicators (KPIs) for each of these areas and report quarterly to senior management on progress. 

FMC is expanding the scope of the data provided for 2013 to encompass both our direct impacts and those that are material to our business and where we have influence. 

#15

As a global business committed to transparency, community engagement and public dialogue, FMC engages in social media discussions.

#16

Labor Agreements Based on Respect

Treating employees with respect is more than a policy; it is at the heart of how we build positive, constructive, effective teams around the world. Independent Regardless of the size of a site or its primary line of business, a strong relationship among those responsible for its operations drives has a benefits for all involved. Managing union relationships can pose challenges for any organization, and FMC is no different. However, for each of our sites, we make every effort to reach agreements that are mutually beneficial. We focus on collaborating to find solutions for everyday interactions as well as contract re-negotiations. We strongly believe in this cooperative approach.

#17

Product Innovations: Assessing Sustainability Advantages from Concept to Market

To facilitate our goal of increasing R&D investments focused on the five identified global challenges, we have adjusted our process to bring new products from concept to reality.

Illustrative example of assessment chart from FMC new product development process.
SpiderGraph

We have defined a “product that creates a sustainability advantage” as one that provides a measurable improvement over existing market solutions – by addressing at least one of the five identified market-shaping shifts – without retreating in performance against any of the others. We then charged each of our businesses with the responsibility to develop an assessment tool that would hold us accountable to our definition. These criteria spur new ideas and allow clear, consistent evaluation of product potential. Most importantly, they enable richer conversations with our customers during the product development phase, as many are attempting to create offerings that answer these same market trends.

Such sustainability-driven process improvements enable us to identify and advance projects that create a sustainability advantage more quickly, while imposing a higher burden of proof on projects that are counter to our sustainability objectives. We are excited about the resulting opportunities for growth and the social impact we can effect with this focused approach. This effort will help to ensure a robust development pipeline to support the continued growth of FMC.

#18

View an interactive map of our global research network.

#19

Case Study: Synthetic vs. Natural Soda Ash Production

Soda ash can be produced either naturally or synthetically. On a global basis, the majority of soda ash is supplied by synthetic production. The natural soda ash process utilized at our Wyoming facilities is significantly less energy-intensive than the alternative. As shown in this diagram, U.S. natural soda ash efficiencies, including FMC’s, are substantial. We can produce and deliver soda ash to customers around the world using less energy and emitting fewer greenhouse gases than if the material were produced synthetically within a customer’s region, even within their home country.

FMCMaps

#20

Natural Ingredients

A rapidly growing middle class is demanding more nutritious foods and increased convenience. To satisfy these consumer expectations, FMC is exploring ways to supply more food ingredients that are both sustainable and renewable. With over 68 years of experience in the business, our expertise helps customers around the world maintain their competitive position in the market using natural ingredients and colors. In addition to addressing consumer preferences, we help our customers use these products to increase the amount of protein in affordable foods and reduce requirements for refrigeration in the supply chain.

As part of a strategic expansion of our natural ingredients business, FMC made three acquisitions that enhance our natural food ingredient product portfolio:

• South Pole Biogroup Ltda., a Chilean-based natural color and specialty nutrition ingredients supplier.
• Phytone Ltd., a leading natural colors producer based in the United Kingdom.
• Pectine Italia, a leading Italian-based manufacturer of pectin, a biopolymer extracted from lemon peels that customers use to gel or thicken foods like jams or fruit juices.

FMC works alongside our customers to better serve local markets through 11 food laboratories in strategic locations around the world. FMC has opened food labs in Singapore, Chile, India and Russia to support the growing demand in rapidly developing economies. This diversity of research locations enables us to provide customers with unique chemistries and customized solutions that align with local consumer demand, while adding value to the innovation process through the exchange of ideas and outcomes between the labs.

#21

TecnoCalda – Managing Products Responsibly in Brazil

Large farms in Brazil can take advantage of our TecnoCalda program, an integrated solution for managing crop protection products at large agribusiness operations in an increasingly safe, secure and efficient manner. Depending on customer needs, FMC can customize any or all of the system components:

• Bulk storage of the products
• Spray tank preparation and equipment loading
• Equipment cleaning
• Waste management (both product and packaging)
• Dedicated spray mix distribution trucks and/or aircraft

The program assists growers on a number of fronts, by helping them protect workers, communities and soil with safe storage, precise mixing, responsible cleanup, and material recycling. In a cost-sensitive business, the TecnoCalda program’s efficiencies also help farmers improve their economic sustainability. In some cases FMC helps farmers finance their investment in the program.

#22

See our Resources page to view and download our Policy on Animal Welfare and Testing.

#23

The Salt That’s Shaking Up Our Energy Future

Our Center for Lithium Energy Advanced Research (CLEAR) is the only facility focused on lithium chemistry innovation within a battery cell. Here, FMC scientists and engineers develop new product concepts, such as our Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder (SLMP®), that are creating step change improvements to electric vehicles’ travel range and battery life.

FMC’s lithium resources and proprietary lithium technology are helping to usher in a new generation of vehicle batteries. Lithium, the lightest metal, stabilized in ultrapure salt compounds, has the ability to store and release energy in a manner that is unsurpassed by any other known material. Used to assist or replace the internal combustion engine, lithium batteries can help reduce carbon emissions and dependence on oil. As such, it is making the vision of electric vehicles (EVs) a reality.

FMC has been developing lithium ion battery technology since 1991. The technology is used in portable electronic devices such as cell phones, laptops and power tools. In recent years, this technology has enabled the development of a broad range of hybrid electric and full electric vehicles. Today we are the second largest supplier of lithium in the world, and the world’s number one supplier of lithium hydroxide and lithium chloride used in rechargeable and non-rechargeable battery applications respectively.

At the heart of FMC’s lithium sustainability story is our knowledge and patented technologies related to the efficient production of high purity lithium products. Higher purity means more robust performance: an extra hour of power or an added year of battery life – both critical for EVs to replace today’s conventional vehicles.

#24

Reducing Production Impacts – Energy Considerations

Our Energy Management Center of Excellence (EMCOE) team is comprised of representatives from the procurement, manufacturing, engineering and sustainability groups and is championed by senior leaders in operations, technology, procurement and sustainability. With the help of external resources added to its combined professional experience of 129 years, this team will become a central repository of best practices in energy management.

The EMCOE is currently undergoing a multi-year process to assess FMC manufacturing sites worldwide and identify opportunities to increase plant energy efficiency. In 2013, the team conducted its first comprehensive plant energy assessments associated with this new program. Read more about the results and next steps in our 2013 sustainability report.

#25

Case Study: Synthetic vs. Natural Soda Ash Production

Soda ash can be produced either naturally or synthetically. On a global basis, the majority of soda ash is supplied by synthetic production. The natural soda ash process utilized at our Wyoming facilities is significantly less energy-intensive than the alternative. As shown in this diagram, U.S. natural soda ash efficiencies, including FMC’s, are substantial. We can produce and deliver soda ash to customers around the world using less energy and emitting fewer greenhouse gases than if the material were produced synthetically within a customer’s region, even within their home country.

FMCMaps

#26

Remediation

Even though our historic operations were designed, operated and maintained using standards and best practices at the time, some operations had environmental impacts that require remediation today. FMC’s approach to remediation focuses on returning our formerly used sites to productive new uses. In the past decade, we have restored eight brownfield sites to beneficial reuses, including sports complexes, hospitals, retail developments, car dealerships, community centers and light industrial parks. In many cases, there is more than one type of redevelopment use on a single former property. Over the last three years, we have spent approximately $90 million on remediation of historic sites.

Our preferred approach is to be proactive with regulators, officials and the local community in identifying alternative reuse scenarios for these sites. Each property is uniquely situated, and some may have remediation needs. FMC is committed to finding ways to return these properties to functioning, safe and beneficial uses.

In each remediation situation, we start with shared goals in mind, doing whatever we can to take all stakeholders’ concerns into consideration. Each project requires a unique plan and an understanding of the community it affects, so we engage with public advisory groups, community partners and citizen task forces to facilitate conversations about each community’s needs. By collaborating on remediation plans, FMC aims to replenish resources, spur economic growth, protect the vitality of our business and the environment, and strengthen our community relationships.

FMC’s ongoing remediation projects are at various stages of completion. A few examples are described here:

• The remediated site of FMC’s former research center near Princeton, New Jersey, now serves as Princeton HealthCare System’s state-of-the-art medical center, which opened in June 2012.

• FMC worked with the city government, regulatory agencies and local leaders in Nitro, West Virginia, to successfully repurpose an old municipal landfill site into a community access boat ramp that now attracts visitors to the area. FMC handled the majority of the cleanup work, earning the 2012 Environmental Excellence Award from the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection for our dedication to long-term stewardship of the site.

• In Pocatello, Idaho we have received an Interim Remedial Record of Decision (IROD) which selected a remedy for the site. FMC has retained a construction firm to commence the implementation of the remedy and anticipates some construction activity to begin this construction season.

• At the Avtex Fibers Superfund Site in Front Royal, Virginia, FMC is completing over 20 years of remedial construction activities. The cleanup of the historical plant area provides land for a business development area encompassing approximately 170 acres and the creation of open space in the remaining areas, including a conservation park. Within the conservation area is a brand new water treatment plant to treat the contaminated groundwater.

• In San Jose, California, 6,256 sports fans attended the October 21, 2012, groundbreaking for a Major League Soccer stadium, setting a Guinness World Record for the largest groundbreaking ceremony ever. FMC helped remediate and redevelop the site, once home to a former FMC division that manufactured and tested defense equipment.

#27

See our Resources page to view and download our Supplier Code of Conduct.

#28

View an interactive map featuring several examples of our global community engagement efforts.

#29

Product Stewardship (2)

Our three businesses (Agricultural Solutions, Health & Nutrition and Minerals) incorporate appropriate health, safety, security and environmental factors into their product lifecycles. Our holistic approach starts with design and development and extends through manufacturing, distribution, storage, end use, and final recycle or disposal. Along the way, those who handle the product are provided with information and training on hazards and safe handling practices.

Each business has an employee responsible for product stewardship who is charged with assessing and documenting the hazards and risks associated with each product. This formal governance process helps us prioritize products for risk management and provides the appropriate level of information and outreach.

FMC uses a variety of tools to help ensure that safety information and knowledge reach those who need it, starting with required documentation such as the Safety Data Sheet and product label.

Depending on the degree of hazard and potential for exposure, FMC also provides a range of information, including some of the items below:

• Customer education initiatives
• Technical brochures and risk information
• Safe handling guidelines and recommendations for the use of protective equipment
• Training in safe handling practices
• Technical support
• Order screening to ensure customer qualification
• Tracking of customer issues and incidents to identify areas for improvement
• On-site customer visits

Training our Customers on Safe Use

As with all FMC businesses, Agricultural Solutions incorporates health, safety, security and environmental considerations into every stage of a product’s life cycle. In our labeling, safety data sheets, product education and other technical assistance, FMC provides the information farmers need to use our products safely. FMC technical experts conduct training meetings with distributors, farmers and applicators on the safe and responsible use of our products. We communicate with our distributors and customers about the latest information on our products, their intended uses, legal requirements, and the consequences of misuse

Although we take many precautions and many thousands of farmers around the world use our products without incident, occasionally we learn of the misuse of products, sometimes with serious results.

Read more about our stand against product misuse and our partnership with Panthera.

#30

See our Resources page to view a video on the work of the Cristo Rey Network.

#31

Click here to view the 2013 FMC Sustainability Report GRI Index.

#32

At FMC, sustainability is about creating enduring value by managing our innovation, operations and business practices to meet the changing demands of our markets, our shareholders and society. Specifically, we’re committed to the principles outlined at right. As we work to help address some of the world’s major global challenges.

Read the opening message

#33

Visit the Our Products page to view an interactive map of our global research network.

#34

We invite you to visit our Resources page to explore our archive of sustainability and annual reports, as well as, our video library and other publications related to our sustainability work.

#35

View an interactive map featuring several examples of our global community engagement efforts.

2013 FMC Sustainability Report Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Index

FMC uses the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) to inform our sustainability reporting. GRI has verified that the 2013 sustainability report was prepared according to the GRI Guidelines, at Application Level B.

GRI provides organizations with guidance in applying its comprehensive sustainability reporting framework covering economic, environmental and social sustainability disclosure criteria. The framework has been broadly adopted around the world to assess sustainability performance. The 2014 FMC GRI Index provides a consolidated list of our disclosures against the G3.1 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines.

We welcome your questions, comments and feedback. For more information about FMC or our Sustainability Report, please contact sustainability.info@fmc.com.

GRI INDEX

1. Strategy and Analysis
1.1 CEO’s statement 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 1
1.2 Key impacts, risks and opportunities. 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 4-7
2013 Annual Report – Form 10K pp. 10-11
2. Organizational Profile
2.1 Name of the organization FMC Corporation
2.2 Primary brands, products, and/or services. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover), p. 2
2013 Annual Report – Form 10K, p. 1
2.3 Operational structure of the organization. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover), p. 2
2013 Annual Report – Form 10K, pp. 1-9
2.4 Location of organizations’ headquarters. Philadelphia PA, USA
2.5 Number of countries where the organization operates, and names of countries with either major operations or that are specifically relevant to the sustainability issues covered in the report. 2013 Sustainability Report –  p. 2
2013 Annual Report – Form 10K, pp. 1-9
2.6 Nature of ownership and legal form. 2013 Annual Report – Form 10K, p. 1
2.7 Markets served (including geographic breakdown, sectors served, and types of customers/beneficiaries). 2013 Sustainability Report –  p. 2
2013 Annual Report – Form 10K, pp. 1-9
2.8 Scale of the reporting organization. 2013 Sustainability Report –  p. 17
2013 Annual Report – Form 10K, pp. 1-9
2.9 Significant changes during the reporting period. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover)
2013 Annual Report – Form 10K, pp. 1-9, 49
2.10 Awards received in the reporting period. 2013 Sustainability Report –  pp. 11, 18
3. Report Parameters
3.1–3.3 Reporting parameters. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover), p. 2
2013 Annual Report – Form 10K, pp. 1-9
3.4 Contact point. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover)
3.5 Process for defining report content. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover), p. 4
3.6 Boundary of the report. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover)
3.7 Limitations on the scope or boundary of the report. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover)
3.8 Basis for reporting on joint ventures, subsidiaries, leased facilities, outsourced operations, and other entities that can significantly affect comparability from period to period and/or between organizations. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover)
3.9 Data measurement techniques and the bases of calculations. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover)
FMC Sustainability Website – http://fmcsustainability.com/visualize-our-data/ /
3.10 Effect of re-statements of information provided in earlier reports/reasons for re-statements. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover)
3.11 Significant changes from previous reporting periods in the scope, boundary or measurement methods applied in the report. 2013 Sustainability Report – About this Report (inside front cover)
3.12 Standard report disclosures. This information can be found in this index, see below.
3.13 External assurance policy and practice. We are not seeking external assurance of our Sustainability Report at this time, but plan to in the future.
4. Governance, Commitments, And Engagement
4.1 Governance structure of the organization. FMC.com: Committee Composition
4.2 Indicate whether the Chair of the highest governance body is also an executive officer. FMC.com: Leadership Team
4.3 Number of members of the highest governance body that are independent and/or non-executive members. FMC.com: Board of Directors
4.4 Mechanisms for shareholders and employees to provide recommendations or direction to the highest governance body. 2014 Proxy Materials
FMC.com: Shareholder Services
4.5 Linkage between compensation for members of the highest governance body, senior managers, and executives and the organization’s performance. 2014 Proxy Materials
4.6 Processes in place for the highest governance body to ensure conflicts of interest are avoided. 2014 Proxy Materials
4.7 Process for determining the composition, qualifications, and expertise of the members of the highest governance body and its committees. 2014 Proxy Materials
FMC.com: Corporate Governance Guidelines 
4.8 Internally developed statements of mission or values, codes of conduct, and principles relevant to economic, environmental and social performance and the status of their implementation. FMC.com: Corporate Governance Guidelines
FMC Code of Ethics and Business Conduct
2013 Sustainability Report – p. 21
4.9 Procedures of the highest governance body for overseeing the organization’s identification and management of economic, environmental, and social performance. Charter of the Audit Committee of the Board Directors
2014 Proxy Materials
4.10 Processes for evaluating the highest governance body’s own performance, particularly with respect to economic, environmental, and social performance. 2014 Proxy Materials
4.11 Explanation of whether and how the precautionary approach or principle is addressed by the organization. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 2
4.12 Externally developed economic, environmental and social charters, principles, or other initiatives to which the organization subscribes or endorses. American Chemistry Council Responsible Care Management System; Multiple ISO certifications at manufacturing locations globally
4.13 Memberships in associations (such as industry associations) and/or national/international advocacy organizations.
  • ACC — American Chemistry Council
  • Agricultural Retailers Association
  • American Natural Soda Ash
  • Brazil-US Business Council
  • Business Roundtable
  • CropLife America
  • EDTA – Electric Drive Transportation Association
  • Glass Packaging Institute
  • ICCF – International Conservation Caucus Foundation
  • Idaho Mining Association
  • Industrial Minerals Association – North America
  • NAM — National Association of Manufacturers
  • Public Affairs Council
  • Regulatory Improvement Council
  • US-China Business Council
  • Wyoming Community Foundation
  • Wyoming Mining Association
  • OFCA
  • RISE (Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment
  • PEC (Pennsylvania Environmental Council)
  • Superfund Settlements Coalition (private but important)
  • IFAC (International Food Additives Council)
  • NatCol- Natural Food Colours Association
  • ABC American Business Council
  • Chemexcil
  • Japan Pest Control Association
  • Ag Retailer Association
  • Ag Container Recycling Council
  • Pyrethroid Working Group
  • National Cotton Council
  • National Ag Marketing Association
4.14–4.17 Stakeholder engagement 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 3-4; Some additional information on specific interactions below:
Employees and Prospective Employees How we engaged with employees: We conducted an employee survey for the second year to determine internal reactions to FMC’s sustainability progress and our 2013 report. Survey respondents represented different regions, age groups and length of service at FMC, thereby ensuring diversity of perspective. In response to their input we have made an effort to provide more transparency and expand on this report’s content. For the first time, we also brought together cross-functional teams at several group meetings to discuss the highlights and challenges that should be included in the report. Feedback from participants indicates that in addition to feeling that they added value to the report, they gained new insights about the meaning of sustainability and its connection to their functions and the company. (See pages 18-19 – 2013 Sustainability Report)

How we engaged with prospective employees: FMC has several digital vehicles through which people interested in knowing more about FMC engage with us. We are also proactive in using online tools for recruitment. (See page 20 – 2013 Sustainability Report)

Business Stakeholders

How we engaged with customers: Sustainability is a high priority for customers who seek responsible partners in their supply chain. This mutual emphasis on greater transparency into sustainability practices is the basis for continuing expansion of our customer dialogue.  Our attention to sustainability metrics and efforts to improve results is a frequent topic of discussion on customer visits and an advantage that makes us a more attractive supplier partner.

How we engaged with suppliers: FMC’s Supplier Code of Conduct requires suppliers to meet specific sustainability criteria. We have increased our supplier screening and monitoring interactions to ensure that the Code is followed.(See page 37 – 2013 Sustainability Report)

Communities, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO) and Governments

How we engaged with communities: We are active members of our communities and undertake a range of activities to improve the safety and wellness of the people around us. We conduct discussions with local stakeholders on remediation and changes made at our facilities, volunteer our time and donate money to worthy causes, and in locations including Rockland, Maine, Green River, Wyoming, and Minera del Altiplano, Argentina, have set up facility-specific websites to keep our neighbors apprised of our activities.

How we engaged with NGOs: We partner with NGOs on several programs and work as a company and through industry associations to find common ground to address issues. Continued dialogue, education and cooperation are used to demonstrate that we are working toward shared goals and are taking steps to move closer to attaining them.(See pages 38-45 – 2013 Sustainability Report)

How we engaged with governments: FMC engages with local and national governments both directly and through industry associations. Topics covered in our interactions range from environment, health and safety (EHS) concerns to product registrations, job growth and economic development to education and leadership endeavors.

Investors

How we engaged with investors: The investment community increasingly requests information about our sustainability results and perspectives. Whether as individuals or groups, investors are seeking transparency into how our sustainability activities align with business value creation.

Management Approach and Performance Indicators
Disclosure on Management Approach (Economic)
Disclosure on Management Approach (Economic) 2013 Annual Report and Form 10-K
EC1 Direct economic value generated and distributed. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 2
EC2 Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization’s activities due to climate change. 2013 Annual Report (Form 10-K) – pp. 26-27
2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 6-7
Disclosure on Management Approach (Environment)
Disclosure on Management Approach (Environment) 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 30-36
2013 Annual Report (Form 10-K) – p. 27
EN3 Direct energy consumption by primary energy source. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 31
fmcsustainability.com/visualize-our-data
EN4 Indirect energy consumption by primary source. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 31
fmcsustainability.com/visualize-our-data
EN6 Initiatives to provide energy-efficient or renewable energy based products and services, and reductions in energy requirements as a result of these initiatives. 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 28, 32
EN8 Total water withdrawal by source. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 33
fmcsustainability.com/visualize-our-data
EN16 Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 32
fmcsustainability.com/visualize-our-data
EN20 NOx, SOx, and other significant air emissions by type and weight. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 32
fmcsustainability.com/visualize-our-data
EN22 Total weight of waste by type and disposal method. 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 33-34
fmcsustainability.com/visualize-our-data
EN23 Total number and volume of significant spills. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 9
fmcsustainability.com/visualize-our-data
EN26 Initiatives to mitigate environmental impacts of products and services, and extent of impact mitigation. 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 23-29
Disclosure on Management Approach (Labor Practices and Decent Work)
Disclosure on Management Approach (Labor Practices and Decent Work) 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 14-20
LA1 Total workforce by region and employment type. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 17
LA2 Total number and rate of new employee hires and employee turnover by age group, gender, and region. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 17
LA3 Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees, by major operations. FMC.com: Careers-Benefits
LA4 Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining agreements. Approximately 30 percent of our U.S.-based and 40 percent of our foreign-based employees, respectively, are represented by collective bargaining agreements.  For more information, see: 2013 Annual Report (Form 10-K) – p. 9
LA7 Rates of injury, lost days, and work-related fatalities. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 9
LA8 Education, training, counseling, prevention, and risk-control programs in place to assist workforce members, their amilies, or community members regarding serious diseases. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 20
FMC.com: Careers-Benefits
LA11 Programs for skills management and lifelong learning that support the continued employability of employees and assist them in managing career endings. 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 14-19
FMC.com: Careers-Benefits
LA12 Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews, by gender See below.
INFORMATION ON LA12:

Our philosophy is that learning and growing on the job are the primary means of development. Individuals and their managers share responsibility for career growth. The needs of FMC businesses create opportunities for employees to undertake challenging work assignments. Employees and managers actively look for those opportunities that match the employees’ interests. Coaching, education and ongoing feedback are tools that are available to both the employee and the manager to support development. Additionally, our Education Program empowers employees to prepare themselves for further development opportunities by supporting the cost of tuition and fees for approved continuing education programs. We continue to work on programs that help prepare and support our employees who are transitioning into retirement. These programs include career transition support, support from local employee assistance programs, financial counseling from our benefit vendors, and personalized care from local human resources managers and supervisors.Additionally, annual summary discussions are expected to take place between employees and managers to formally evaluate performance and discuss plans for increasing for increasing the employee’s skills, knowledge and abilities. All salaried employees must have a performance discussion and development review document completed at least every 12 months.

LA13 Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees by indicators of diversity. 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 17
FMC.com: Leadership Team
Disclosure on Management Approach (Human Rights)
Disclosure on Management Approach (Human Rights) 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 21, 36-37
HR2 Percentage of significant suppliers, contractors and other business partners that have undergone human rights screening, and actions taken. 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 36-37
HR3 Total hours of employee training on policies and procedures concerning aspects of human rights. 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 21
FMC employees completed more than 2500 hours of compliance training in 2013, supplemented by courses taught be the FMC law department.
Disclosure on Management Approach (Society)
Disclosure on Management Approach (Society) 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 38-45
SO1 Percentage of operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and development programs. We work to engage the local community at all of our sites around the world (see 2013 Sustainability Report – p. 38-45 for examples).
SO2 Percentage and total number of business units analyzed for risks related to corruption. Under FMC’s rigorous anti-corruption risk assessment program, one hundred percent of FMC business units are analyzed for risk related to corruption.
SO3 Percentage of employees trained in organization’s anticorruption policies and procedures. All FMC employees located throughout the world receive basic training for legal compliance and ethical behavior, including anti-corruption training. Those management and non-management employees who are in commercial positions and those who have contact with government officials receive additional, more focused anti-corruption training.
Disclosure on Management Approach (Product Responsibility)
Disclosure on Management Approach (Product Responsibility) 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 13, 39-41
PR1 Life cycle stages in which health and safety impacts of products and services are assessed for improvement, and percentage of significant products and services categories subject to such procedures. 2013 Sustainability Report – pp. 13
FMC Sustainability Website –http://fmcsustainability.com/our-products
PR5 Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction. See below.
Information on customer programs (PR5):
We find that the knowledge we’ve gained by listening closely and observing our customers helps to shape our innovation and product development efforts. We strive to hear the voice of the customer. While we do this primarily through personal interactions, we also employ tools such as surveys and provide services for customers including training and technical assistance. Our feedback and interaction mechanisms range from customer forums and user groups to formal mechanisms for customers to express any aspect of service where they are not satisfied. We value all input, especially that which leads to further improvement.
The following indicators are partially reported: EC1, EN3, EN20, LA1, LA2, LA7, LA13.

Our Materiality Process

In our 2013 report, we discuss the sustainability issues we believe are of most interest to our stakeholders that are also relevant to FMC’s long-term business objectives. Learn more about our 2013 Materiality Assessment here.